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This account is here to introduce the wider Fediverse to some of the terms people in the professional wrestling business use to describe the business, their interactions, and the world at large.

Hopefully you'll find some of these terms useful and incorporate them into your everyday conversations.

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Why use wrestling slang?

For starters, the terms are (generally) innately understood by native English speakers. Few were created; most simply have additional meanings to fit more contexts.

This slang also has the benefit of not being stolen from any particular race or ethnicity. It's not harmful to any group except, perhaps, people whose business is creating a false reality for crowds.

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Most training schools have classes teaching our next term.

promo (noun):

1 Any interview, in-ring speech, or conversation presented in kayfabe and meant to further a storyline.

Example: "CM Punk's 'pipebomb' promo is a great example of a worked shoot."

cut a promo (verb):

1 To deliver a speech, conversation, or interview that highlights a disagreement.

Example: "I knew Kay was hot with me after the break room incident, but I didn't expect her to cut a promo on me to HR!"

For the record: Most professional wrestlers are total marks for wrestling. A performer working in front of an audience of their fellow wrestlers would be hard-pressed to find a better crowd.

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Generally, most fans today are smarks in the original sense; few people don't recognize that most of wrestling is a work. "Mark" used to be a more carny term, just another person to separate from their money. It's shifted now that audiences know they're being worked; "mark" is often a term of affection for fans who buy in to the performance and react appropriately to characters and events, and smarks who are "too smart" to react are derided.

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smark (noun):

1 An audience member who is aware of the difference between kayfabe and reality.

Example: "If there are too many smarks in the crowd, you won't get the reaction you want."

2 An audience member or fan who believes they know too much about wrestling, or is unwilling to acknowledge kayfabe.

Example: "You get these smarks online trying to talk to you about your contract because they read an article in some dirtsheet."

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If I didn't have a relationship with today's words, I wouldn't be doing this. 😸

mark (noun):

1 A fan.

Example: "I'm such a mark for Lady Gaga."

2 An audience member who isn't aware of the difference between kayfabe and reality.

Example: "Dumb marks can't tell the difference between a work and a shoot!"

mark out (verb):

1 To express one's fan appreciation; POP.

Example: "When I saw him rip the ladder in half, I totally marked out!"

When a face has a really tough time getting over and connecting with a crowd, a "heel turn" is often suggested to bring new life to the character. It works on many occasions, too; being liked by everyone is tough, but being disliked by people who already didn't care much can be easy.

Of course, some wrestlers go through so many face and heel turns that audiences joke about it happening at the slightest provocation. ("The Big Show" Paul Wight comes to mind.)

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Let's get a couple more of the really vital terms down today.

heel (noun):

1 A kayfabe villain; a "bad guy".

Example: "Britt's having a much better run as a heel."

face, babyface (noun):

1 A kayfabe hero(ine); a "good guy".

Example: "Jake's such a face, he volunteers at an animal shelter on the weekends."

tweener (noun):

1 A person who talks or acts as a heel might, but remains over with the crowd as a face; an anti-hero(ine).

Example: "Stone Cold was a perfect tweener."

John Cena, a face for most of his very lengthy run as a performer, once toyed with a crowd by lifting the toes of one foot and pivoting, "turning heel".

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When a face has a really tough time getting over and connecting with a crowd, a "heel turn" is often suggested to bring new life to the character. It works on many occasions, too; being liked by everyone is tough, but being disliked by people who already didn't care much can be easy.

Of course, some wrestlers go through so many face and heel turns that audiences joke about it happening at the slightest provocation. ("The Big Show" Paul Wight comes to mind.)

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Let's get a couple more of the really vital terms down today.

heel (noun):

1 A kayfabe villain; a "bad guy".

Example: "Britt's having a much better run as a heel."

face, babyface (noun):

1 A kayfabe hero(ine); a "good guy".

Example: "Jake's such a face, he volunteers at an animal shelter on the weekends."

tweener (noun):

1 A person who talks or acts as a heel might, but remains over with the crowd as a face; an anti-hero(ine).

Example: "Stone Cold was a perfect tweener."

The emotions, reactions, and connection to the audience are very important to wrestling. The most over people on a roster will get a pop for simply walking through the curtain, and that has meaning, certainly; it means a lot more if you can pop the crowd a few times during an actual match, or while cutting a promo. Those are the moments that really help put someone over.

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Last night's great AEW event made this term very relevant today!

pop (noun):

1 A positive crowd reaction, like cheering or clapping.

Example: "Did you hear the pop Norm got for just walking through the door?"

pop (verb):

1 To respond loudly to an event.

Example: "I popped so hard when her music hit that my dogs started barking!"

mental health, social media 

Hana Kimura had "go away" heat with viewers of Terrace House after an on-screen altercation with a housemate. She was insulted and attacked on social media by viewers.

Bullying is never easy to handle, accept, or ignore; for a wrestler, a person whose bread and butter is fostering a connection to crowds, it had to hit extremely hard.

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"Go away" heat doesn't mean someone is over. "Go away" heat means there is absolutely no respect from or connection to the crowd. Good guys can have "go away" heat if they're booked poorly, like regularly fighting for championships despite having a limited skill set and a string of losses. "Go away" heat means the audience would rather see ANYONE ELSE filling that role.

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There are a few kinds of heat. "Cheap heat" comes from simple, low-effort insults one could make in any town. Insulting the local sports teams or calling people in the South "rednecks" might get someone cheap heat.

"Go away heat" (or, sometimes, "X-Pac heat") tends to be less about one's kayfabe actions and more about the whole performer. If someone has "go away" heat, they've done something (or several things) do distasteful that audiences never want to see them again.

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I considered not posting a word today, but thinking about the sad news from last night, this term popped in my head.

heat (noun):

1 Negative thoughts, feelings, or reactions a crowd expresses for a worker; anger; dislike.

Example: "Jason has so much heat, he needs a security escort to get into the building."

If your character is a villain, heat generally means you're doing well and is a measure of how over you are.

memorial post (sui) 

Kimura Hana of Wonder World Ring STARDOM is dead.

Friends and folks: For every hundred people who don't know you at all, there are people out there who DO know you and, knowing you, love you.

Please, never let social media outweigh the words, the feelings, and the outreach of those close to you.

Storms may seem impossible to weather. No matter how hard, they're easier to weather with a solid crew, and you have one.

Hell, I'll be your crew of one if you need me.

memorial post (sui) 

Kimura Hana of Wonder World Ring STARDOM is dead.

Friends and folks: For every hundred people who don't know you at all, there are people out there who DO know you and, knowing you, love you.

Please, never let social media outweigh the words, the feelings, and the outreach of those close to you.

Storms may seem impossible to weather. No matter how hard, they're easier to weather with a solid crew, and you have one.

Hell, I'll be your crew of one if you need me.

Today's term means almost the opposite of its common use in modern culture.

over (adjective): Popular; beloved.

Example: "Kacey's so over, she could take candy from a baby and the baby's mom would offer her another piece!"

go over (verb): To win.

Example: "I asked Mark to do business at trivia tonight, and he agreed. I'm totally going over."

Surprisingly, there's not much use of "under" in the pro wrestling world; you're over, or you're going over, or you're jobbing. If you're not over, you should work on your character, talk to the booker, and try to get pushed.

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